EDPS 360 (A2) Fall 2013

Archive for July, 2014|Monthly archive page

First Nations Education: Will Rejection of the Latest Initiative Signal the End for Top-Down Devolution?

In Uncategorized on July 27, 2014 at 8:40 am

Educhatter

The mysterious hand of the Canadian Indian Act is still present in First Nations communities, and is particularly evident in the realm of education. Until the late 1960s, schooling for First Nations children and youth was essentially “assimilationist.” “The primary purpose of formal education,” as stated in the report of the 1996 Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, “was to indoctrinate Aboriginal peoples into a Christian, European world view, thereby ‘civilizing’ them” (Canada 1996, vol. 3, chap. 5, 2). Since the publication of “Indian Control of Indian Education” by the National Indian Brotherhood in 1972, over 40 years ago, policy changes in the form of federal-local education agreements, authorized under SGAs, for the most part have only reinforced the status quo of top-down, albeit partially delegated, federal control over education (Fallon and Paquette 2012, 3).

AtleoandHarperConformity with mainstream society, competition, and preparation for the workforce were…

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Even superprofessors deserve academic freedom.

In Uncategorized on July 10, 2014 at 7:30 am

Ah, the superprofessor. We do have a few if those now, don’t we?

ACADEME BLOG

Over on my personal blog, I write a lot about MOOCs. You might say I’m more than a little MOOC-obsessed, but I really am trying to develop other interests. That effort ran aground this week when a Massive Open Online Course at the University of Zurich basically imploded. It’s a confusing story (the Chronicle report on it is here  and the IHE report is here if you want to try to figure it out for yourself), but the best I can tell is that the professor leading that MOOC on “massive learning,” Paul-Olivier Dehaye, deleted its contents while in progress in order to protest the data collection policies of the MOOC provider that sponsored it, Coursera.

Since Dehaye has made no direct statement about his actions, the early reporting (and the Twitter speculation before anything got reported) included a number of other theories. Nevertheless, the definitive explanation for Dehaye’s actions…

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Flunking the Revised SATs — FAIR

In Assessment, Choice, Exams on July 4, 2014 at 9:00 am

I’d like to see some data like this on recent Alberta examinations. If you are familiar, please pass along the information.

Flunking the Revised SATs — FAIR.

P.S. Yes, I’m feeling lazy today, but isn’t that the sun shining out there?

Of High Handed Tactics, Education Reform, and the Ghost of Jim Keegstra

In ATA, Commentary, Current Events on July 3, 2014 at 10:04 am

Another (perhaps) unintentionally inflammatory piece by Paul Simons in today’s Edmonton Journal.

Without going into her argument line by line, I think Paula is barking up the right analytical tree when she takes aim (mixed metaphor…yuck!) at a structural problem. Her structural analysis, however, is far too simple and, worse, is entirely non-empirical.*

Screenshot 2014-07-03 09.56.46

Paula’s column and the Twitter furore began like this last night. Will we ever be free of the Keegstra case? I assume not, and perhaps rightly so.

The point I want to make is this: any purely theoretical argument (here, the ATA has a conflict of interest = system is bad/a “mess”) must stand up to an empirical test. Put simply, does the supposed structural problem compromise real-world teacher review/discipline? ATA voices and others have provided plenty of information demonstrating that the process works quite well. Should we trust this claim out of hand? Of course not, but compare the ATA’s approach to Mr. Lemire’s as presented in Paula’s piece. The call to improve process may have some merit Read the rest of this entry »

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